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Mathematics

Monday 1st June, 2020

LC: To be able to write amounts of money as decimals. 

You have already learned lots about whole numbers (ones, tens, hundreds and thousands). Also, last term, you learned about tenths (1/10 or 0.1) and hundredths (1/100 or 0.01) which are not whole numbers. 

 

You will need to use this knowledge in order to help you with the learning over the next two weeks. 

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How much money do you have in coins? 

Have you noticed that the cost of the smoothie is written as a decimal number on the price tag? 

 

I wonder how I record the amount of money I have in coins as a decimal number...

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Can you see that 10 pence is one tenth of a pound? 
 

If you are unsure, think about how many 10 pence pieces fit into 1 pound. 
 

There are 10 of them in a pound like the bars show above. 


Because pounds (£) are whole numbers, anything that is smaller than a pound is recorded as a decimal number. 
 

10 pence pieces are written in the tenths column when recording them as a decimal. 
 

So 10p = £0.10            tenths column

                       Then, a place holder (0) is written  
                        in the hundredths column. 

10p is smaller than a £ so a 0 is needed in the ones column to show you have no pounds. 

Don’t forget the decimal point between your ones and tenths. 

          
 

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Can you see that because I have one pound, a one has been put in the ones column?
 

This time I have five 10p, not one, so now 5 have been put in the tenths column to show I have 5 tenths. 
 

Then, the place holder has been put in the hundredths. 
 

We say £1.50 as one pound fifty. 

Picture 1

This is breaking down the cost of the smoothie into pounds and pence.

 

£1.30 (one pound thirty) 

 

Can you see that the smoothie costs one pound and thirty pence?    (£1 and 30p) 

 

Can we afford the smoothie if we have £1.50? 
 

Yes we can! 

Use what you have learned in order to complete the guided practice. 
 

Remember, this is guided so an older brother or sister, mum or dad can support you. 
 

When you get to the independent work (in your maths workbook) that is when you give it a go yourself. 

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Click on the button below to check your answers to guided practice question 1.
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Click on the button below to check your answers to guided practice question 2

Quick revision before starting your independent work.

Quick revision before starting your independent work. 1
Now complete Worksheet 1- pages 43 and 44 in your work book.
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